Tommy Hilfiger’s Spring 2018 Adaptive Collection Is Here

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For individuals with disabilities, getting dressed in the morning can pose a significant challenge. Fastening buttons, pulling a shirt over one’s head, and shimmying into tight-fitting garments can be next to impossible—and for the most part, no mainstream clothing retailers do anything to help.

In the spring of 2016, Tommy Hilfiger launched a collection of clothes for kids specifically designed for those with disabilities. Instead of buttons, there were clever hidden magnet closures. Necklines expanded with touch fastener closures along the seams. And then in fall of last year, the collection expanded to include pieces for adults.

The spring 2018 Adaptive Collection launches today, with a campaign that features notable figures from the disabled community. There’s Paralympian gold medal track star Jeremy Campbell, motivational speaker Mama Caxx, paraplegic dancer Chelsie Hill and 18-year-old autistic chef Jeremiah Josey.

With learnings from the first collection, this season’s Adaptive Collection has made improvements: Double plackets at the waistline make it easier for those in wheelchairs, bungee cord closure systems replace unwieldy zippers and the Velcro closures got a little better.

Continue onto Elle to read the complete article.

SUNRISE MEDICAL QUICKIE® Xenon2 – New Ultra Lightweight, High- Performance, Folding Wheelchair Series

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Today, Sunrise Medical announced the launch of its latest high-performance ultra lightweight folding manual wheelchair. The QUICKIE Xenon2 offers all the benefits of QUICKIE’s high-end rigid chairs, now in a folding version. This series brings a sleek look to the portfolio and delivers the ride of a rigid wheelchair with the convenience of folding.

At the core of the Xenon2 is a unique cross-brace that gives the chair a minimalistic, open frame that you would usually associate with a rigid wheelchair. A more forward axle provides greater responsiveness, and a more rearward axle provides greater stability. The combination of the cross-brace and axle provide the stiff, stable driving performance feel of a rigid frame but with all the portability of a folding one. The Xenon2 allows for a custom fit with adjustability to the center of gravity, backrest angle, rear seat height, along with other key areas.

“We are excited to follow up on the successful introduction of 7000 series aluminum and ShapeLoc technology offered in our rigid portfolio by extending the same benefits into our family of folding wheelchairs,” said Jesus Ibarra, Sunrise Medical Associate Product Manager, Manual. “After years of success across Europe, we’re bringing the same proven technology to our North American markets and manufacturing them in our Fresno, California facility.”

Available in three unique frame styles – Fixed Front, Hybrid (Dual Tube), and Swing- Away – this lightweight, high-performance folding series is designed to be adaptable to the changing needs of the user. With its clean and streamlined design, the Fixed Front model is the lightest with a transit weight weighing less than 20 lbs. The Hybrid model is the strongest of the three, and its reinforced fixed front frame allows a maximum user weight capacity of 300 lbs. Its dual tube design reduces flex, giving the chair a more rigid ride and greater push efficiency. The Swing-Away model is designed with a reinforced frame with removable swing-away hangers for easy transfers and has the most compact folded dimensions for easy portability.

For videos, images and additional information on the QUICKIE Xenon2, please visit http://www.sunrisemedical.com.

About Sunrise Medical: A world leader in the development, design, manufacture and distribution of manual wheelchairs, power wheelchairs, motorized scooters and both standard and customized seating and positioning systems, Sunrise Medical manufactures products in their own facilities in the United States, Mexico, Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, China, Holland, Poland, Norway and Canada. Sunrise Medical’s key products, marketed under the QUICKIE, Sopur, Zippie, Breezy, Sterling, Jay, Whitmyer and Switch It proprietary brands, are sold through a network of homecare medical product dealers or distributors in more than 130 countries. The company is headquartered in Malsch, Germany, with North American headquarters in Fresno, Calif., and employs more than 2,180 associates worldwide.

For additional information, please contact Karen Gallik; Karen.Gallik @ sunmed.com

VMI Launches the Most Spacious Accessible SUV on the Market

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Consumers, able-bodied or not, prefer SUVs to minivans at a rate of more than 6:1 based on annual automotive sales reported in the Wall Street Journal (WSJ). Tim Barone, CEO of Vantage Mobility International (VMI), said “One of VMI’s core values is to never forget the challenges faced by our customers. When we started to explore the possibility of converting an SUV, our core value remained the focal point of our mission as we spoke with wheelchair users and their families to understand their wants and needs.” Barone continued, “We started with people who wanted an accessible SUV, but couldn’t find one that met their needs. During our research, we consistently received feedback that an SUV meant more than style. It meant normalcy. We learned that an SUV itself isn’t enough. The right SUV must have the physical design and practical space to meet our consumers’ specific demands.”

“The introduction of the VMI Honda Pilot Northstar E™ accessible SUV with its innovative manual in-floor ramp offers the perfect combination of simplicity, space and style at a great price,” Barone said. Customers looking for a caregiver vehicle that offers accessibility and sweet style will find this vehicle delivers exceptional wheelchair maneuverability and room for the family. It’s equipped with practical features that put the “utility” in an SUV, such as a ramp that’s easily stowed out of the way, a removable front passenger seat for greater seating flexibility, and plenty of usable storage.

Built into this new SUV from VMI is its exclusive Access360® which sets a new standard for generous wheelchair space and maneuverability. “VMI’s Honda Pilot Northstar E™ SUV boasts more space for large power chairs to enter the vehicle and maneuver comfortably, more flexibility with a removable front seat and confidence that it will deliver a superior experience,” said Barone. VMI’s stated unique features of the product include:

  • Expansive door opening width (33.5 in.) and door height (55.5 in.) to make entry and exit easy.
  • An in-floor ramp which is stowed within the vehicle floor with no squeaking or rattling—keeping dirt and debris out of the vehicle cabin.
  • A wide (32 in.) durable ramp to accommodate large power wheelchairs.
  • Flexible seating lets the wheelchair user sit in the front passenger position or the spacious mid row.
  • An obstruction-free doorway for safe entry and exit without having to deploy the ramp for able-bodied passengers.
  • Overhead, and added floor and door lighting making wheelchair securement easier in lowlight conditions.
  • A rear bench footrest that’s easy to use and offers additional comfort for passengers seated on the rear bench.
  • An extra cargo storage area conveniently incorporated below the rear bench seat.
  • 100% crash tested to all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards governed by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration

For more information or to test drive the all-new Honda Pilot Northstar E™ SUV available from VMI, call 855-864-8267 or visit www.myvmisuv.com.

About VMI

Vantage Mobility International (VMI) is a leading manufacturer of wheelchair accessible vehicles built on Toyota, Honda, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) chassis. The company has advanced the mobility industry for 30 years with a robust portfolio of minivan and SUV conversions as well as platform lifts. VMI, based in Phoenix, Arizona, has been awarded the prestigious Toyota Gold Certificate for Quality and its manufacturing facility utilizes Six Sigma techniques to employ continuous process improvements and deliver high quality products for personal use and commercial applications.

Six Simple Tips for Smooth Travel With a Disability

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Times have changed for travelers who use wheelchairs, are visually or hearing-impaired or have another disability, says Jayne Bliss, a travel adviser with Tzell, who has more than 30 years of experience in planning trips for those with special needs.

“No place is off limits, and hotels, museums and cultural institutions offer more accessibility than ever before,” Ms. Bliss said. Here are some of her tips to travel smoothly with a disability:

Ask Your Airline for Help

Asking your airline for assistance, either at the time of booking or a few days before your trip, will make your time at the airport much easier. Many airlines will designate an employee to meet you curbside when you arrive or at check-in with a wheelchair (if you need one) and guide you through security. You can also request assistance when you land at your destination.

There is usually no charge for this service, but policies vary by airline and may depend on available staff and your disability, so be sure to clarify with your carrier before you fly. Also, many carriers allow guide dogs on board free of charge for passengers who are visually-impaired (as long as you make a reservation for your guide dog at least 48 hours in advance of your flight).

Plan With Your Hotel in Advance

Most hotels in all price ranges welcome travelers with disabilities, according to Ms. Bliss. However, it’s key to give them a heads up about what your needs are if there’s anything specific. If you’re in a wheelchair, for example, get measurements for the front, guest and bathroom doors in advance of your stay. Most hotel concierges will be happy to provide you this information, any many list it online. Ms. Bliss said that some her clients’ wheelchairs are too large for many properties, even if they claim to have accessible rooms and facilities. Also, if you’re visually impaired and find buffet breakfasts or continental breakfast bars challenging, ask your hotel’s concierge to fill your in-room fridge with breakfast items, or deliver them to your room instead.

Work With a Travel Agent

An agent who specializes in working with disabled travelers can arrange every aspect of your trip including booking your airline tickets, tours and restaurants. They can make sure to get the measurements you need, verify the hotels, resorts, or restaurants you’re interested in are accessible, and provide other services to make sure you have a smooth trip and a comfortable stay.

Some of these agents, including Ms. Bliss, don’t charge trip planning fees, and instead make money by booking you with hotels and resorts that are hungry for your business (and ideally, accessible). To find other specialists, consider agencies that have experts on-staff that specialize in accessible travel, like the ones at Travel LeadersNew Directions Travelor Disabled Travelers, among others.

Continue onto the New York Times to read the complete article.

Sesame Place Theme Park Is the First ‘Certified Autism Center’ in the World

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“Sesame Street” has been a strong supporter of kids on the autism spectrum in the last few years. In 2015, through the “Sesame Street and Autism: see amazing in all children” initiative, they introduced Julia, a muppet on the autism spectrum, in a story book. Last spring, Julia made her TV debut as a regular cast member on the “Sesame Street” show.

Now, Sesame Place in Philadelphia will become the first theme park in the world designated as a “Certified Autism Center” (CAC) by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES).

IBCCES provides training and credentials through their “Certified Autism Specialists, Board Certified Cognitive Specialists and Certified Autism Center.” A representative from IBCCES told The Mighty all their programs are research-based, and their boardincludes two professionals who are on the autism spectrum (Dr. Stephen Shore and Kerry  Magro), as well as neurologists and psychologists — one of whom is also the parent of a child with Down syndrome — and other experts. “We work hard to ensure our programs are well rounded, evidence-based, practical and inclusive!” the rep said. The programs originated almost 18 years ago and are available in all 50 states and 42 different countries.

On April 2, “Sesame Street” announced in conjunction with IBCCESS, the completion of a staff-wide autism sensitivity and awareness training at the theme park. Sesame Place is the first theme park in the world to receive such a distinction, according to a press release. The park is getting ready for its 38th season, opening on April 28, 2018.

According to “Sesame Street’s” release, Sesame Place will be required to provide ongoing training for team members “to ensure they have the requisite knowledge, skills, temperament, and expertise to interact with all families and children with disabilities, specifically on the autism spectrum. Training takes place in the areas of sensory awareness, environment, communication, motor and social skills, program development, and emotional awareness as well as a comprehensive autism competency exam.”

To keep their certification, Sesame Place must take the autism training every two years.

“As the first theme park in the world to complete the training and become a CAC, Sesame Place is better equipped to offer families inclusive activities for children with autism and other special needs,” said Sesame Place park president Cathy Valeriano in their official release.

Continue onto The Mighty to read the complete article.

 

AI technology helps students who are deaf learn

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As stragglers settle into their seats for general biology class, real-time captions of the professor’s banter about general and special senses – “Which receptor picks up pain? All of them.” – scroll across the bottom of a PowerPoint presentation displayed on wall-to-wall screens behind her. An interpreter stands a few feet away and interprets the professor’s spoken words into American Sign Language, the primary language used by the deaf in the US.

Except for the real-time captions on the screens in front of the room, this is a typical class at the Rochester Institute of Technology in upstate New York. About 1,500 students who are deaf and hard of hearing are an integral part of campus life at the sprawling university, which has 15,000 undergraduates. Nearly 700 of the students who are deaf and hard of hearing take courses with students who are hearing, including several dozen in Sandra Connelly’s general biology class of 250 students.

The captions on the screens behind Connelly, who wears a headset, are generated by Microsoft Translator, an AI-powered communication technology. The system uses an advanced form of automatic speech recognition to convert raw spoken language – ums, stutters and all – into fluent, punctuated text. The removal of disfluencies and addition of punctuation leads to higher-quality translations into the more than 60 languages that the translator technology supports. The community of people who are deaf and hard of hearing recognized this cleaned-up and punctuated text as an ideal tool to access spoken language in addition to ASL.

Microsoft is partnering with RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, one of the university’s nine colleges, to pilot the use of Microsoft’s AI-powered speech and language technology to support students in the classroom who are deaf or hard of hearing.

“The first time I saw it running, I was so excited; I thought, ‘Wow, I can get information at the same time as my hearing peers,’” said Joseph Adjei, a first-year student from Ghana who lost his hearing seven years ago. When he arrived at RIT, he struggled with ASL. The real-time captions displayed on the screens behind Connelly in biology class, he said, allowed him to keep up with the class and learn to spell the scientific terms correctly.

Now in the second semester of general biology, Adjei, who is continuing to learn ASL, takes a seat in the front of the class and regularly shifts his gaze between the interpreter, the captions on the screen and the transcripts on his mobile phone, which he props up on the desk. The combination, he explained, keeps him engaged with the lecture. When he doesn’t understand the ASL, he references the captions, which provide another source of information and the content he missed from the ASL interpreter.

The captions, he noted, occasionally miss crucial points for a biology class, such as the difference between “I” and “eye.” “But it is so much better than not having anything at all.” In fact, Adjei uses the Microsoft Translator app on his mobile phone to help communicate with peers who are hearing outside of class.

“Sometimes when we have conversations they speak too fast and I can’t lip read them. So, I just grab the phone and we do it that way so that I can get what is going on,” he said.

AI for captioning

Jenny Lay-Flurrie, Microsoft’s chief accessibility officer, who is deaf herself, said the pilot project with RIT shows the potential of AI to empower people with disabilities, especially those with deafness. The captions provided by Microsoft Translator provide another layer of communication that, in addition to sign language, could help people including herself achieve more, she noted.

The project is in the early stages of rollout to classrooms. Connelly’s general biology class is one of 10 equipped for the AI-powered real-time captioning service, which is an add-in to Microsoft PowerPoint called Presentation Translator. Students can use the Microsoft Translator app running on their laptop, phone or tablet to receive the captions in real time in the language of their choice.

“Language is the driving force of human evolution. It enhances collaboration, it enhances communication, it enhances learning. By having the subtitles in the RIT classroom, we are helping everyone learn better, to communicate better,” said Xuedong Huang, a technical fellow and head of the speech and language group for Microsoft AI and Research.

Huang started working on automatic speech recognition in the 1980s to help the 1.3 billion people in his native China avoid typing Chinese on keyboards designed for Western languages. The introduction of deep learning for speech recognition a few years ago, he noted, gave the speech technology human-like accuracy, leading to a machine translation system that translates sentences of news articles from Chinese to English and “the confidence to introduce the technology for every-day use by everyone.”

Continue onto Microsoft’s Blog Room to read the complete article.

Apple Proposes Adding Disability-Inclusive Emojis to the Unicode Consortium

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Emojis of people using wheelchairs, service dogs, hearing aids and more could be coming to your iPhone. On Friday, Apple submitted a proposal to the Unicode Consortium — the non-profit that reviews requests for new emojis.

Apple’s request includes a total of 13 new emojis. The emojis fall into four categories, deaf and hard of hearing, blind and low vision, physical disabilities, and hidden disabilities, according to the company’s proposal. Apple collaborated with the American Council of the Blind, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation and the National Association of the Deaf.

“The current selection of emoji provides a wide array of representations of people, activities, and objects meaningful to the general public, but very few speak to the life experiences of those with disabilities,” Apple states in its proposal. “At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs. Adding emoji emblematic to users’ life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability.”

Apple is not the first to call for disability-inclusive emojis. People with disabilities have been asking for more inclusive emojis for years. In 2016, Scope, a U.K.-based nonprofit which promotes inclusion for people with disabilities, released 18 emojis featuring disabled people and highlighting the Paralympics. None of these emojis, however, are part of the Unicode keyboard.

Currently, there is only one disability-related emoji — the “wheelchair symbol” — despite the fact that approximately 20 percent of the population lives with a disability. Fictional creatures, like mermaids and zombies, on the other hand, have 14 different emojis. According to Scope, of the 4,000 Twitter users they polled, 65 percent of users said one emoji wasn’t enough to represent the full spectrum of disability.

Continue onto The Mighty to read the complete article.

Google Debuts Wheelchair Accessible Routes in Google Maps

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wheelchair accessible routes

Google Maps will now show wheelchair accessible routes in cities like Boston, New York, and London.

The search giant said Thursday that people can now use Google Maps to get directions that are catered specifically to people with mobility problems.

Although people can use Google Maps to get around using public transit, those routes may not be best suited for people with wheelchairs or who have other disabilities.

Google (GOOG, -3.63%) said that it teamed with transit agencies to help it catalogue the best wheelchair-accessible routes. To find those routes, Google Maps users enter where they want to go, tap on the “Directions” tab, and then choose “wheelchair accessible” as one of the options under the “Routes” section.

The company is debuting the new feature in major metropolitan areas worldwide. In addition to Boston, New York, and London, the option is available for Tokyo, Mexico City, and Sydney.

“We’re looking forward to working with additional transit agencies in the coming months to bring more wheelchair accessible routes to Google Maps,” Google product manager Rio Akasaka said in a blog post.

Continue onto Fortune to read the complete article.

This Smart Paint Talks To Canes To Help People Who Are Blind Navigate

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ohio state school for the blind

The Ohio State School for the Blind is pioneering new technology that causes canes to vibrate when it touches lines of traffic paint.

The crosswalk on a road in front of the Ohio State School for the Blind looks like one that might be found at any intersection. But the white stripes at the edges are made with “smart paint”–and if a student who is visually impaired crosses while using a cane with a new smart tip, the cane will vibrate when it touches the lines.

The paint uses rare-earth nanocrystals that can emit a unique light signature, which a sensor added to the tip of a cane can activate and then read. “If you pulse a laser or LED into these materials, they’ll pulse back at you at a very specific frequency,” says Josh Collins, chief technology officer at Intelligent Materials, the company that manufacturers the oxides that can be added to paint.

As the company explored how the paint could be used with autonomous cars–the paint could, for example, help a car recognize an intersection or lane, or provide markers that make GPS much more accurate–they realized that the paint could also be useful for people who are blind.

A person who is blind usually relies on the sound of parallel traffic rushing by them on the side to help stay oriented while crossing the street and not veer out of a crosswalk (in some cities, beeping walk signals also help). But that doesn’t always work well, and it’s particularly challenging on streets with less traffic.

“It’s much easier to stay oriented when you can hear those traffic sounds,” says Mary Ball-Swartwout, an orientation and mobility specialist at the Ohio State School for the Blind, who helps teach students skills for navigating. “When we talk about lower-traffic areas, that’s where [smart paint and a smart cane] could really have a lot of use.”

Students at the state-run boarding school, which has a large, enclosed campus in Columbus, Ohio, will help researchers test several crossings with the new paint on the school’s internal streets. The paint, which can be clear or gray on a gray surface so it’s essentially invisible to sighted people, could also be used in other locations. “We’re also thinking about providing them with guidance as they move down a sidewalk or guidance about whether or not they’ve arrived at a bus stop or at a certain destination,” says John Lannuti, a professor of materials science engineering at Ohio State University who connected Intelligent Materials with the School for the Blind.

GPS, which isn’t precise enough to distinguish between a street or a sidewalk–and occasionally doesn’t even recognize the right street–isn’t a foolproof system for navigation. But the paint could help someone identify, for example, if they are standing on the northwest or southwest corner of an intersection, or the exact location of an entrance to a building. The paint could also be used with other navigation tools.

“What we’re envisioning is sort of a Google Maps for the blind, that says, okay, you want to go to the barbershop, and sets a path for you and tells you when you’ve arrived because the cane senses a stripe of paint associated with the barbershop,” Lannuti says. “There may be a point where a smartphone connected to the paint speaks to the user.”

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

Finding Closed-Caption Content Online

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Q. How do I find English-language content with English-language subtitles? I am hard of hearing and lots of content, principally movies, will have subtitles in every language under the sun, except English.

A. Some video providers may be putting those subtitles in the settings for closed captions, which may be why you do not see English in the list of available languages for English-language content. Even though they may be grouped together by some companies, subtitles and closed captions are technically different features.

Subtitles serve to translate dialogue from one language to another. Closed captions — designed to aid the deaf and hearing-impaired — are transcriptions of spoken dialogue, and can also include written descriptions of other sounds in the scene, like a car honking or a baby crying.

Streaming and download services like Amazon PrimeNetflixGoogle PlayHuluiTunes and the Windows Store are among the many sources of video with closed captions, and caption availability is typically listed in the description of the movie or TV show. To enable the captions, start playing the video and then look for a settings or closed captions icon (CC) in the tool bar.

Vimeo and YouTube support videos that contain closed captions, although not every creator includes them. The New York Times began adding closed captions to videos produced by the newsroom last year.

If a video includes closed captions but you do not see them, check the settings of your device to make sure the closed captions option is enabled. Apple’s iOSMac operating system and Apple TV set-top box all have caption controls in their Accessibility preferences, as do other systems like Google’s Android software systems and Roku’s TV set-top boxes. Microsoftkeeps similar settings in the Ease of Access area for its Windows 10 and Xbox One software.

Continue onto New York Times to read the complete article.

Have a lower leg injury? Don’t just sit there and suffer, get moving!

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iwalkfree

LOS ANGELES, Calif.– Each year, there are millions of people who end up with lower leg injuries. Those who have experienced it know all too well the way it can make something like mobility a new challenge to conquer.

Yet the majority of people need to still be able to get around to go to school, work, run errands, and just continue to participate in life. Time and duties don’t come to a halt with a lower leg injury, so knowing how to get around easier can make a world of difference.

“The last thing people want when they have a lower leg injury is to be holed up in the house and stuck on the couch waiting it out,” explains Brad Hunter, the innovator of iWALK2.0 and the chief executive officer of the company, iWALKFree, Inc.  “There are things people can do to help make it easier during this challenging period. Taking steps to make it easier will help keep people more mobile and less frustrated.”

According to the National Institutes of Health, there are 6.5 million people in the country who need to use some type of device to assist with their mobility. Here are some tips for helping make mobility easier while having a lower leg injury:

1. Consider using the iWalk2.0. Those who use crutches often find that they make mobility more challenging. They keep both hands busy, making it difficult to carry things or even open doors. The iWALK2.0 has been designed to help people easily get around with their lower leg injury and at the same time do so hands-free.

2. Plan ahead. Taking the time to plan out errands and tasks will give people an opportunity to determine which will be the easiest routes and schedules to take. Planning ahead will help people stay organized, determine the routes that are the best for increasing mobility, and will reduce the stress of backtracking.

3. Ask for help. Many people shy away from asking others for help. They don’t want to burden them or feel like they are being a pest. The truth is that most people won’t mind one bit helping out. Don’t shy away from asking for help when it is needed.

4. Look for obstacles. When you arrive at your destination, take a moment to scan the area for what could be potential obstacles. If you know stairs will be difficult, for example, or if you see the sidewalk is blocked off for repair, determine the best way to navigate around it before approaching the area.

5. Getting around. If your lower leg injury is preventing you from being able to drive, determine your other options. Ask friends and family members for rides, and if that is not an option check with your local bus company to see what they can provide. Many public transportation systems offer a home pickup and drop-off option for those in need.

“The important thing to remember is that this is a temporary challenge and you can take measures that will help to make mobility easier during it,” adds Hunter. “We routinely hear from people who love how the iWALK2.0 has made their mobility easier. Our system has helped countless people to navigate the challenge of a lower leg injury with more ease and confidence.”

The IWALK2.0 was developed as a way to help make healing from a lower leg injury more comfortable and to increase the ease of mobility. The original prototype was created by a farmer in Canada.  The concept continued to develop, and the iWALK2.0 was launched in late 2013. Sales really took off when Harrison Ford was photographed wearing it.

The iWALK2.0 is hands-free, easy to learn to use, it’s intuitive, and safe. From the knee up, the leg is doing the same walking motion that comes naturally to it. The device is essentially a temporary lower leg, which gives people their independence and mobility back as they recover from an injury. The device is pain-free, and makes it possible for people to engage in many of their normal routine activities, such as walking the dog, grocery shopping, and walking up or down stairs.

Clinical research, the results of which are on the company website, shows that patients using the iWALK2.0 heal faster, and have a higher sense of satisfaction and a higher rate of compliance. The iWALK2.0 sells for $149 and is available online and through select retailers. Some insurance companies may cover the cost of the device. The device can be used with a cast or boot, and comes with a limited warranty. For more information on the iWALK2.0, visit the site at: http://iwalk-free.com. To see a video of the iWALK2.0 in action, visit: iWalkFree

About iWALKFree
The iWALK2.0 is a hands-free knee crutch, made by iWALKFree, Inc.  It’s a mobility device used instead of traditional crutches and knee scooters. It offers more comfort and independence, with the hands and arms remaining free. The device offers people a functional and independent lifestyle as they are recovering from many common lower leg injuries. For more information on the iWALK2.0, visit the site at: http://iwalk-free.com

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Source:

National Institute of Health: How many people use assistive devices? https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/rehabtech/conditioninfo/people