DAV’s 2017 Outstanding Disabled Veteran of the Year

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Dr. Kenneth Lee

Dr. Kenneth K. Lee president of the Wisconsin Adaptive Sports Association

Disabled American Veterans (DAV) named Dr. Kenneth K. Lee, a combat-injured Operation Iraqi Freedom and Army veteran, its 2017 Outstanding Disabled Veteran of the Year.

Lee, who deployed as the commander of the Army’s Company B, 118th Area Support Medical Battalion, was injured in November 2004 by a suicide car bomber in Iraq. The explosion resulted in an open head traumatic brain injury and severe shrapnel wounds to his legs, which led to his evacuation back to the states, where he would later be diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

While recovering from his injuries, Lee, a rehabilitation specialist, saw how long and difficult recovery could be, often leaving lasting changes. Lee, who resides in Brookfield, Wisconsin, is a volunteer physician at the National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic, which the Department of Veterans Affairs and DAV co-host, so he was no stranger to using adaptive sports as therapy. Through his own recovery, Lee propelled himself into the world of adaptive sports to help him deal with the psychological and physiological effects that can often cause an individual to hit bottom.

Within a year of Lee’s retirement in 2013, he formed the Milwaukee Wheelchair Lacrosse team and is now the president of the Wisconsin Adaptive Sports Association (WASA) which runs numerous adaptive sports programs.

DAV National Commander David W. Riley presented Lee the award at the organization’s 96th National Convention in New Orleans.

“Dr. Kenneth Lee is a shining example of everything that is good about our nation and its veterans,” said Riley. “The compassion he shows for other veterans and his work to help them find success is truly the hallmark of this award, and we’re very proud of what he’s doing for this community. At DAV, we truly value the importance and therapeutic effectiveness of adaptive sports and it is vital to have experienced leaders like Dr. Lee involved and carving out a path ahead.”

Despite his injuries and the constant pain in his lower extremities, Lee speaks with gratitude about his time in the Army.

“I got a lot more from the Guard than I put into it,” said Lee. “I joined the military with my eyes wide open. I volunteered to join. I have no regrets.”

Lee and his wife Kate currently live in Brookfield, Wisconsin, with their two children. As a youth volunteer, in 2014 his daughter Leah earned a $10,000 scholarship by volunteering for the DAV at the Milwaukee VA Medical Center. On the same day he will be honored as the charity’s veteran of the year, his son Jonathan has earned the charity’s largest scholarship of $20,000 and will be honored the same morning. They both hope ultimately to serve veterans as physicians through the VA.

About DAV
DAV empowers veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. It is dedicated to a single purpose: fulfilling our promises to the men and women who served. DAV does this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; providing employment resources to veterans and their families and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning

About DAV
DAV empowers veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. It is dedicated to a single purpose: fulfilling our promises to the men and women who served. DAV does this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; providing employment resources to veterans and their families and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life. DAV, a non-profit organization with nearly 1.3 million members, was founded in 1920 and chartered by the U.S. Congress in 1932.

Learn more at dav.org.

Rice Krispies Treats Just Took A Real Step Toward Inclusivity

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Kids with visual impairments can get loving messages with their snacks through Braille stickers and audio boxes.

Kellogg’s is increasing accessibility to the full joys of Rice Krispies Treats for children with visual impairments.

Last year, the packaged food giant rolled out writable wrappers on individual Rice Krispies Treats so that parents and others could pen encouraging messages for kids to read at school. But those notes wouldn’t reach some 62,000 American schoolchildren who are blind or low-vision, as the company said on its website.

So Rice Krispies announced Tuesday that it has partnered with the National Federation of the Blind to create “Love Notes” in the form of Braille stickers and recordable audio boxes, allowing kids with visual impairments to get a verbal boost with their snacks too.

The Braille stickers come in sheets of eight with preprinted uplifting phrases such as “You’ve Got This” and “Love You Lots.” They’re shaped like a heart, which matches the spot for writing notes on the Rice Krispies wrapper.

Because some children don’t read Braille or respond better to the spoken word, Kellogg’s is also offering a recordable audio box in which to tuck one Rice Krispies Treat. When the box is opened, it plays a 10-second message recorded by mom or dad.

According to Kellogg’s, the audio message can be re-recorded more than 1,000 times. That amounts to several school years’ worth of support ― assuming kids bring the boxes home each day.

The stickers and the audio boxes can be ordered through the Rice Krispies Treats website at no cost while supplies last.

The Love Notes also honor Will Keith Kellogg, the founder of the Kellogg Company, who lost his sight for the last decade of his life, according to Jessica Waller, vice president of sales and co-chair of the Kapable Business/Employee Resource Group at Kellogg’s.

“Inclusion is in our DNA, and is now shared through Rice Krispies Treats’ ‘Love Notes,’” Waller said in Tuesday’s press release. “Everyone is important, and we want each child to be able to feel loved, supported and acknowledged.”

Continue onto the Huffington Post to read the complete article.

Doctors With Disabilities Push For Culture Change In Medicine

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Lisa Iezzoni was in medical school at Harvard in the early 1980s when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. She started experiencing some of the symptoms, including fatigue, but she wasn’t letting that get in the way of her goal. Then came the moment she scrubbed in on a surgery and the surgeon told her what he thought of her chances in the field.

“He opined that I had no right to go into medicine because I lacked the most important quality in medicine,” Iezzoni recalls “And that was 24/7 availability.”

Iezzoni didn’t end up becoming a doctor. This was before the Americans with Disabilities Act passed in 1990, and she says she just didn’t have the support.

In the decades since, court rulings and amendments have clarified rights and protections. But culture change has been slow to take hold in the profession.

Doctors are often portrayed as pinnacles of health, superhumans responding to emergencies around the clock, performing miracles of all kinds. They’re seen as the fixers, not the ones ever in need of accommodations or care.

“This profession historically has viewed themselves as able-bodied in the extreme,” Iezzoni says.

Now, a growing movement of current and aspiring doctors with disabilities is starting to challenge that narrative, saying it is a disservice both to the medical profession and to patients.

It’s important to acknowledge and accommodate medical professionals with disabilities, says Lisa Meeks, a psychologist and researcher at Michigan Medicine specializing in disabilities in medicine and medical education. “It deserves attention and its own problem-solving,” she says.

Meeks co-founded the Coalition for Disability Access in Health Science and Medical Education, a group focused on improving access to medical education for students with disabilities.

She also co-authored a report released this year on disabilities and medicine, which found that many doctors still conceal their disabilities out of fear of stigma or bias.

Earlier this year, Meeks had a thought: If doctors with disabilities saw more people like themselves, would they talk more openly about the challenges and opportunities? She started a social media campaign with the hashtag #DocsWithDisabilities.

The goal was to find 20 doctors willing to share their stories online. She has been flooded with interest from doctors with disabilities.

“There’s no end in sight,” Meeks says.

And now #NursesWithDisabilities have joined in, too.

“I felt this was a really unique opportunity to introduce all of these docs with disabilities to the medical field,” she says. “To let people know there are not unique one or two physicians with disabilities, but that there are a number of physicians with disabilities throughout the United States.”

Continue onto NPR to read the complete article.

9 things you need to know about how to behave around assistance dogs

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By Soraya Ferdman

Recently, I noticed a person about to cross the street — right into the path of an oncoming car. Before I could lunge forward to pull her back, her guide dog yanked its owner to safety. I felt the strong urge to pet the dog, which in addition to being a very good dog was also an Australian Shepherd, the same breed as my own. 

Then I noticed the words “DO NOT PET” across the dog’s harness.

The term “assistance dog” includes guide dogs, who help the blind; hearing dogs, who help the Deaf; and service dogs, who help people with a broader range of disabilities including but not limited to autism, epilepsy, life-threatening allergies, diabetes, mobility issues, neuromuscular diseases, and psychological trauma.

Thousands of people rely on these animals for independence. Assistance dogs perform services such as opening and closing doors, helping people into an upright position, and detecting allergens, low and high blood sugar levels, and more. But for those used to thinking of dogs purely as pets, it can be hard to know the proper etiquette.

Here’s what you need to know about how to behave when you spot a pooch with a harness:

1. Minimize distractions

Most assistance dogs are trained to pay little attention to people other than their handler. That doesn’t mean handlers aren’t bothered by people’s tendencies to pet, make cutesy noises, or otherwise distract their dogs.

“I’ve had people making noises, desperate to get my dog’s attention, while I’m crossing the street,” Laurel Hilbert, who lives in San Francisco and is blind, explained in an interview with Mashable. “My dog is very well-behaved, but he’s still just a dog. Those kinds of noises distract him.”

Petting an assistance dog may seem like a harmless transgression, but it can lead to the handler falling or otherwise injuring themselves.

Such was the case with Hayley Ashmore. Flynn, her seizure-alert dog, was being pet by a stranger when Hayley fell to the ground and injured her forehead and cheek. In an Instagram post reflecting on the events, Ashmore wrote, “My dog is my lifeline. I don’t say that to be cute… If he gets distracted this happens. If he gets distracted I can die.”

2. Talk to the handler

Remember: The handler and assistance dog are a team. If you feel you need to approach the dog for any reason, asking the handler for permission first is the best way to be aware of what the duo feels comfortable with, and to behave accordingly.

3. Keep your own dog at distance

Though dogs are social creatures, assistance dogs aren’t supposed to engage with other dogs while on duty. Pet owners can help handlers keep assistance dogs focused by holding their companion dogs a safe distance away.

4. No treats

According to Canine Companions for Independence, “Food is the ultimate distraction to the working dog and can jeopardize the working assistance dog team.”

Think of it like this: Beyond breaking their focus, some service dogs have special diets, and certain foods may trigger allergies. If an assistance dog is given something that triggers even a subtle allergic reaction, they’re not paying 100 percent attention to their handler. Less than 100 percent attention = bad news.

5. Therapy and emotional support dogs are not assistance dogs

While therapy and emotional support dogs are there to provide comfort, they do not receive the same training and are not granted legal access to the same degree as assistance dogs.

What distinguishes an assistance dog from what expert Chris Diefenthaler calls companion dogs, or regular pets, is the length and rigor of training. Before acquiring official status, assistance dogs undergo up to two years of training. Diefenthaler, an administrator at Assistance Dogs International, repeatedly emphasized this distinction to Mashable, explaining, “Assistance dogs have received extensive training and are uniquely equipped to help their handlers in ways neither therapy nor emotional support animals are trained to do.”

Continue onto Mashable to read the complete article.

Starbucks to Open First U.S. Signing Store

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Starbucks will open its first Signing Store in the U.S. in Washington, D.C. this October, building upon ongoing efforts to connect with the diverse communities it serves. A team of Deaf Starbucks partners (employees) and allies led the effort to launch this unique store model in the U.S., which will be located at 6th & H Street near Gallaudet University, a bustling hub that is Deaf-friendly. The store will create a distinctive retail experience for all customers, while offering a unique store format that promotes accessibility and offers employment and career advancement opportunities for Deaf and hard of hearing people.

“The National Association of the Deaf applauds Starbucks for opening a Signing Store that employs Deaf and hard of hearing people,” said Howard A. Rosenblum, CEO of the National Association of the Deaf. “Starbucks has taken an innovative approach to incorporating Deaf Culture that will increase employment opportunities as well as accessibility for Deaf and hard of hearing people, while at the same time educating and enlightening society.”

Creating Opportunities with the Deaf Community

Starbucks will hire 20-25 Deaf, hard of hearing and hearing partners from across the country to work at the Signing Store with a requirement that all be proficient in American Sign Language (ASL). This team of partners with a shared language of ASL and diverse experiences with the Deaf and hard of hearing community will help to attract and develop talent, as well as raise awareness and understanding of the Deaf experience in the workforce, including career opportunities at Starbucks and beyond.

“This is a historic moment in Starbucks ongoing journey to connect with the Deaf and hard of hearing community, hire and engage Deaf and hard of hearing partners, and continue to find ways to be more inclusive, accessible and welcoming to all,” said Rossann Williams, Starbucks executive vice president of U.S. Retail. “This store is truly from partners, for partners, and we couldn’t have gotten here without the team of Deaf partners and allies from our Accessibility office and the Access Alliance partner network who came together to bring this vision to life. I look forward to the team welcoming the community to this store in October.”

Designing the First U.S. Signing Store

The idea to open a Signing Store in the U.S. was inspired by a similar Starbucks Signing Store which opened in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in 2016 with nine Deaf partners. Starbucks partners in the U.S. voiced the opportunity to create a similar third-place experience for the Deaf and hard of hearing community in the U.S., and traveled to Malaysia last July for the first-year anniversary to understand design modifications and gain knowledge to create the best possible store experience for Deaf and hard of hearing customers in the U.S. An internal team made up of Starbucks Deaf Leadership, Accessibility office and Access Alliance is playing a critical role to support this historic store opening.

Continue onto Starbucks’ Newsroom to read the complete article.

 

Forget managing chronic arthritis pain, prevent it from happening!

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smiling doctor in hospital lab

MARINA DEL REY, California–According to the National Institutes of Health, over 25 million American adults suffer from pain on a daily basis. More than 23 million of them report that they are in a lot of pain.

The majority of these people will have a poor health status, use more health care, and suffer from more disability as a result of their chronic pain. Oftentimes people don’t know how to successfully go about managing it, or preventing it from happening in the first place. One pain expert, Dr. Akash Bajaj, is helping patients beat chronic pain through Alpha Mac, or Alpha 2 Macro-Globulin treatment.

“The beauty of this new treatment is that it doesn’t just attack the pain that is there and make it stop, it prevents inflammation which is the cause of the pain from happening in the first place,” explains Dr. Bajaj, board-certified interventionist, pain specialist and medical director at Remedy Spine & Pain Solutions in Marina Del Rey, Calif. “Being able to stop pain is great, but when you can prevent it from happening, it just doesn’t get any better or more powerful than that.”

Chronic pain can result from a variety of issues, including sports injuries, poor lifestyle choices, traumatic injury, and arthritis, among other issues. Chronic pain is often the result of chronic inflammation. Being able to nix the chronic inflammation ultimately prevents the pain from ever happening. That’s exactly what the Alpha Mac treatment does. While many people are familiar with stem cell treatments and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) treatments, the Alpha Mac treatment takes it one step further.

Popular treatments that people often use for arthritis joint and degenerative disc chronic pain only provide temporary relief, and then the patients are usually subjected to repeated exposure to harmful chemicals, such as steroids. The Alpha 2 Macro-Globulin treatment blocks or inhibits the inflammatory reaction, which decreases the body’s ability to create inflammation in the affected joints. Alpha 2 Macro-Globulin therapy, like PRP treatment, is a very simple in-office procedure.

“Millions of people suffer from pain every year. Pain can occur from sporting injuries, everyday activities or just from getting older,” says Dr. Bajaj. “Traditional treatments include steroid injections, physical therapy, chiropractic care or a combination of these as well as pain medications. While these are useful treatments the problem with them is there is really no end point in sight for the patient. Patients placed on medications may need to continue their use on an ongoing basis with the risk of developing side effects or even addiction. The same applies to physical therapy and steroid based injections.”

Now a new treatment is available that is natural, non-toxic and is derived from the patient’s own blood to eliminate pain. Alpha Mac therapy utilizes the body’s own healing properties to help decrease inflammation, which typically is the underlying source of the pain. Inflammation can affect virtually any area of the body including the joints, lower back, the neck or other areas.

The doctor takes a small amount of blood, which is processed through a centrifuge to extract the Alpha 2 Macro-Globulin. Then, the Alpha Mac is injected at the source of the inflammation. This leads to a decrease in chronic pain in joints and the spine that are due to arthritis, sports injuries, etc. Alpha 2 Macro-Globulin seeks out and removes pro inflammatory enzymes. The procedure works quickly, is not very painful, and provides effective chronic arthritis pain relief. Alpha Mac uses components derived from a patient’s own blood, primarily enzymes that act quickly to eliminate inflammatory chemicals, allowing the regenerative properties of PRP to work more quickly. Together these therapies, both derived from the patient’s own blood, are bringing superior outcomes compared to single modality approaches.

“I’ve been suffering from chronic pain for a number of years; one of the worst parts about it is the anticipation…waiting for the symptoms to rear their ugly head. Alpha Mac has changed my life, I no longer have to nervously wait for the onset of pain,” says David Graham, a 57-year old pro golfer. “Cutting it off at the pass has greatly improved my quality of life. I thank Dr. Bajaj for that.”

The procedure is performed by Dr. Akash Bajaj, who is an award-winning surgeon, and highly regarded pain management specialist. For more information on services provided or to book an appointment, visit their site at: remedypainsolutions.com.

About Remedy Spine & Pain Solutions
Founded and run by award-winning surgeon and pain management expert Dr. Akash Bajaj, the center is located in Marina Del Rey, Calif. They provide advanced solutions for those who suffer from all types of chronic pain. They also offer a minimally invasive, highly effective implant surgery for those with chronic back pain. Remedy Spine & Pain Solutions has won numerous awards, including multiple times winning Super Doctors award and the Best of Marina Del Rey award. For more information on services provided, visit their site at: remedypainsolutions.com.

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Filmmaker with Quadriplegia is Changing the Face of STEM

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Woman with Quadriplegia

Crystal R. Emery, a dynamic producer, author, and filmmaker known for producing socially conscious works and stories that celebrate the triumph of the human spirit, is the founder and CEO of URU The Right To Be, Inc., a nonprofit content production company that tackles social issues via film, theater, publishing, and other arts-based initiatives.

Triumphing over two chronic diseases as a quadriplegic, Emery continues to shape a successful personal and professional life. She attributes her breakthrough as a producer and writer and growth as a human being to her participation in the classes taught by Guru Madeleine at The New School of Learning in New Rochelle, New York.

The previous issue of Black EOE Journal featured an article on her documentary Changing the Face of Medicine, which aired nationally on PBS and the WORLD channel. Now, Emery isn’t only changing the face of medicine, but also Changing the Face of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) with her national education and engagement program that inspires Americans to rethink their perceived limitations.

URU The Right To Be, Inc. presented the Changing the Face of STEM initiative last year at the National Academy of Sciences, in Washington, D.C., which included conversations with well-known leaders in STEM disciplines and an awards event. The forum was a significant component of the educational initiative, which will go global this year with the American Film Showcase’s international tour of U.S. embassies in several countries around the world. This effort is part of the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

Black woman working with studentsEmery also published Master Builders of the Modern World: Reimaging the Face of STEM, a book that tells the stories of women and the members of under-represented populations and their contributions to the past, present, and future of STEM.

By showing what black, brown, female, and people with disabilities have already accomplished, Emery and the URU The Right To Be, Inc. are hoping to inspire the next generation of scientific minds to reach for the stars.

Source: URU The Right To Be, Inc.

Asos praised for disabled-friendly clothes

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Asos has been praised for selling clothes designed with people who have disabilities in mind.

The online retailer has released a tie-dye waterproof jumpsuit for festival season, which has been adapted to be wheelchair friendly.

It was designed in collaboration with GB Paralympic hopeful Chloe Ball-Hopkins, who also modelled it for the site.

Chloe says she wants to make “fashion that is accessible to everybody”.

The collaboration came about through a single email sent to Asos by Chloe, who’s also a BBC Bristol sports reporter as well as an athlete.

She’s currently training for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics after an injury stopped her competing in archery in Rio two years ago.

“To see the final product I can’t believe that we actually worked in conjunction so much. I thought maybe they’d take it and run with it,” Chloe says.

“You get the same version whether it’s you or I buying it – that’s the point. It is exactly the same for me as it is for you.”

People have reacted excitedly to the release and to seeing Chloe model it in her wheelchair.

Gurls Talk, an online community founded by model Adwoa Aboah, praised it for challenging “the stigma around disabilities”.

Chloe had the idea for the jumpsuit after getting soaked at Splendour Festival last year left her looking, as she told her boyfriend, “like you’ve taken your gran out of the care home for a day”.

It features a zip around the waist so that despite being an all-in-one it’s easy to get in and out of, and also means people can choose to wear just the top or the bottoms.

Chloe says the ankles are cuffed, “so not only is that good for people with different heights, it also means it’s easy to put wellies on.”

Continue onto BBC to read the complete article.

Online Shopping For Consumers With Disabilities

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online-shopping

Online shopping eliminates many of the challenges individuals with disabilities face when shopping at physical stores. For the 56.7 million people with disabilities (19% of the U.S. population) just finding reliable transportation for shopping is a big challenge. One survey found individuals with disabilities are twice as likely to lack transportation as their non-disabled peers.

Scarcity of accessible parking, lack of elevators, and high product shelves are shopping challenges that affect the 30.6 million folks who have difficulty walking, climbing stairs, or who use a wheelchair, cane, or walker. Online shopping eliminates many of these common challenges. E-commerce also makes it easier to comparison shop the best brands at the lowest prices — an important consideration for a group that averages lower incomes, higher medical expenses, and lower employment rates. Most major e-commerce companies work with advocacy groups to ensure their websites are accessible to everyone. However, not all websites are fully compliant with accessibility standards or ADA laws, so some people are left out.

Web accessibility means integrating sites with tools like screen readers or offering choices like blocking blinking page elements so that people with disabilities can surf, shop, and ship the products and services they need. People with disabilities make up an enormous and powerful economic group that represents about 10% of total online spending. But for people with disabilities to take full advantage of online shopping, they need the right tools and resources. We’re happy to say that Wikibuy works with most of these tools, and we’re currently working on 100% compatibility.

Table of Contents

Improving Screen Readability Resources for online shoppers with low vision, colorblindness, or dyslexia that help them read what’s on their computer, tablet, or smartphone screen.

Regaining Hand Control Resources that help people with hand mobility issues more effectively use a computer input device like a keyboard or mouse.

Supporting Cognitive & Physical Limitations Resources to help people with learning disabilities get easier access to e-commerce websites using memory aids and software that removes distractions.

Supporting People Who Are Hard of Hearing Resources to help people who are hard of hearing better interact with product review videos and audio ads, by providing captioning.

Enhancing Web Experience Resources to help website owners and designers stay compliant with accessibility standards.

Improving Screen Readability

Blind/low vision

Some folks with visual impairments may have difficulty navigating the many elements of a website, which makes it tough to shop or pay for products and services. Since many ecommerce sites contain an overabundance of product images and descriptions, people with visual impairments may struggle to:

Locate a page’s menus and controls.
Track the movement of the cursor.
Adjust to changes on a page, like popup windows or scrolling ads.
Follow the constant flow of information while scrolling.
Confirm correct personal or payment information in a form field.
Although people who are legally blind or have low visual acuity may have difficulty distinguishing on-screen details, resources like screen readers, magnifiers, and text-to-talk apps help bring things into focus.

Screen readers

Screen readers are a type of computer software that translates on-screen text into an audio voice or into braille for refreshable braille displays. The voice speed is adjustable, giving users more flexibility for following along. To keep users oriented, screen readers read aloud specific graphic elements like icons, images, or sections like “payment options”. The software identifies these sections as a user highlights them with their mouse or hovers over them with their cursor. The software will also read back any text the user inputs, like their name or credit card number.

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Online Resources

ChromeVox — Text-to-talk Chrome extension
Talking Web — Text-to-talk Chrome extension
Firefox browser — Compatible screen reader
Best screen reader — web browser pairings
10 free screen readers
Screen reader simulation — Experience what it’s like to use a screen reader
Amazon’s screen reader optimized website.
Software
JAWS (Windows)
VoiceOver — Screen reader and media creation tool (Mac)
NVDA — Free screen reader (Windows)
BRLTTY — Driver for braille displays (Linux)

Screen magnifiers

Screen magnifiers are software or physical devices that enlarge text, icons, and other on-screen graphics for people with low vision. Digital magnifiers let users adjust the contrast of text, sharpen edges of images, and change the colors of webpage elements. To add more flexibility, screen magnifiers also follow along with user actions, enlarging areas of the screen as they type text or move their cursor. Physical screen magnifiers fit over a computer’s monitor or smartphone screen and enlarge the image like a magnifying glass.

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Screen magnifiers (Devices)
Flat screen and LCD magnifiers
Laptop screen magnifier
Top 5 best screen magnifiers for smartphones
Microsoft Comfort Optical Mouse 3000 — Mouse with magnifier function built in
Large-key keyboards — Easy to see, high-contrast keys
Screen magnifiers (Software)
ICONICO (Windows)
Magnifixer (Windows)
Virtual Magnifying Glass (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux)
Easy Reader (Windows, iOS and Android)
SuperNova Magnifier (Windows 7, 8.1 & 10)
MagniLink IMax (Mac)
ZoomText Magnifier (Windows 10, 8.1 or 7 with Service Pack 1 (or later))
ZoomText Mac (Mac)

Colorblindness

Colorblindness affects many parts of a person’s life, from driving to shopping. Many forms of colorblindness exist, but for shoppers who have it, each one creates a major problem: confusing one color for another. Many things people without colorblindness take for granted are a challenge to those who can’t discern red from green or who lack color vision (achromatopsia) all together. Something as simple as being able to tell ripe bananas from green ones is something people with colorblindness have to consider when shopping at brick-and-mortar stores.

Ecommerce websites can also be confusing spaces. Colorblindness presents challenges while shopping online for clothing, shoes, house furnishing, or anything else that needs color coordination. Those with achromatopsia can have problems identifying colored links to checkout pages or other product pages. Folks with colorblindness often enlist friends and family when making a choice, whether it’s choosing ripe fruit or the right Fruit of the Loom. Here are some resources to help:

Color Enhancer — Customizable color filter for webpages to improve color perception
Visolve — Software that transforms computer display colors into discriminable ones
ColorCompass — App that lets users identify the color of any element on a screen by clicking it (Mac)
Color Blind Pal — App that helps people who are colorblind see the colors around them
Enchroma — Eye glasses that help correct colorblindness
Colorblind Test — Test for colorblindness
Colorblind Simulator — Simulation for experiencing colorblindness

Dyslexia

People with dyslexia can find it problematic matching the letters they see on a webpage with the sounds those letters make. Dyslexia is a common disability, affecting up to 20% of people, and can restrict interaction with ecommerce websites, taking away the advantages of online shopping.

Some people with dyslexia may find product descriptions, reviews, or instructions confusing, which means they can’t compare products or evaluate them properly before purchase. Websites often contain large blocks of text or text over images. Both can negatively affect the online shopping experience of a person with dyslexia. At check out, security measures like CAPTCHA tests for bots but leaves some users with dyslexia frustrated, closing their browser with products still in their shopping cart. Here are some other website design elements that limit access to people with dyslexia:

  • Decorative, unfamiliar, or serif fonts
  • Large blocks of texts with little white space
  • High brightness contrast between the text and background colors (white on black)
  • Distracting videos, audio, and web animations
  • Sequenced lists that are inconsistent or unpredictable
  • Fortunately, people with dyslexia have many options when it comes to apps, browser extensions, and software that makes accessing ecommerce websites much easier.

Continue on to read the complete article from Wikibuy here

‘Black, queer, disabled and brilliant’: Activist hopes to make history in space

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Eddie Ndopu wasn’t expected to live past 5 years old. Now, the 27-year-old South African hopes to be the first person with a disability to travel to space.

Eddie Ndopu describes himself as “black, queer, disabled and brilliant.”

“I embody all of the identities that position me at a disadvantage in society,” he told NBC News. “But I am turning that on its head.”

By the end of the year, the 27-year-old South African hopes to become the first person with a disability to go to space.

When Ndopu was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), an incurable condition that causes progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. His prognosis was devastating: His family was initially told he would not live beyond the age of 5.

But a tenacious Ndopu said it wasn’t long before he was able to “outstrip and outlive all expectations,” both academically and medically. He attributes this in part due to his mother, whom he said never gave up on him or stopped fighting for him.

Ndopu said when he was 7 years old and living in Namibia (he moved to neighboring South Africa when he was 10), his mom came home to find him sitting in front of the television staring despondently at a blank screen. “She held my head in her hands and begged me to tell her what was wrong,” Ndopu recalled.“Finally, I told her all I wanted was to go to school.”

Despite inclusive education laws, growing up disabled in southern Africa meant a mainstream education was never guaranteed. In fact, a 2017 United Nations report revealed that even today, 90 percent of disabled children in developing countries never see the inside of a classroom.

But Ndopu said his mom is a “fearless warrior” who knocked on “every door” until finally he was accepted to a small elementary school on the outskirts of his hometown.

Ndopu has so far outlived his prognosis by more than two decades, and last year he became the first African with a disability to graduate from Britain’s prestigious University of Oxford. The disability-rights activist, who admits he has a weakness for lipstick and fashion, said he is “a living manifestation of possibility.”

Now Ndopu, whose disease has left him unable to walk, has set himself a new “audacious” goal: to become the first person with a disability to go to space.

Backed by the United Nations, he hopes to deliver “the speech of [his] life,” championing disability rights from a space shuttle to the UN’s New York headquarters this December.

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, a South African lawmaker and the executive director of UN Women, told NBC News if Ndopu attains his goal, it would be “a powerful symbol to demonstrate that people with disabilities can break barriers.”

“By reaching space,” she added, “it clearly demonstrates that determined disabled people, in an enabling environment, can excel like anyone else.”

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5 Reasons to Consider a Simple Implant to Treat Chronic Back Pain

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The vast majority of adults know what it’s like to experience back pain. In fact, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), around 80 percent of adults will experience back pain at some point in their life.

But for most people, that pain doesn’t last long and goes away on its own. About 20 percent of those who experience acute back pain will go on to have chronic back pain, which the NIH classifies as pain that lasts for at least 12 weeks, and even after the initial injury or underlying cause of the acute pain has been treated. The good news for those who are living with chronic low back pain is that there is an effective, simple implant procedure that is bringing people relief within only three weeks.

“We’ve helped many people to experience a greater quality of life through the implant procedure,” explains Dr. Akash Bajaj, board-certified anesthesiologist, pain interventionist and medical director at Remedy Spine & Pain Solutions in Marina Del Rey, Calif. “People are surprised at how simple the procedure is and how much relief it brought them after recovery. The only regret they have is not having it done sooner.”

Those suffering from chronic pain tend to have higher rates of depression and a lower, diminished quality of life. They are often not able to engage in the activities they would like to, because they are so burdened with the pain. In fact, a study published in the Journal of Pain Research shared the findings of research done on how chronic pain impacts people and their social environment. Researchers reported that chronic pain seriously affects the patient’s daily activities and quality of life, as well as having significant consequences for the patient’s families, and even causes deterioration in the quality of life of those close to them.

Most people with chronic pain search for solutions and try many different things in order to find some relief. Millions turn to taking opioids or other drugs, which can have harmful side effects and lead to dangerous addictions. A new implant procedure is giving people relief and helping them avoid taking drugs to help address the pain.

Here are 5 reasons why more people are considering a simple implant procedure to treat their chronic back pain:

  1. Minimally invasive.The implant surgery is minimally invasive, which means small incisions are made in order to perform the procedure. This means there is a decreased risk for complication, there’s reduced scarring, and it’s more affordable.
  2. Time invested.Most people think that having a minimally invasive surgical procedure would require a lot of time. This one takes only one hour to complete, which most people are comfortable with.
  3. Recovery time.With a recovery time of only around 24 hours, people are able to go back to their normal routines within a day. That means they won’t have to take off a lot of work or avoid engaging in their duties for long.
  4. Benefits.The full benefits of the implant surgery are realized in about three weeks. Those who have the surgery experience full back pain relief within that time, giving them the ability to engage in more activities.
  5. Improved quality of life.Once people experience the benefits that the implant surgery brings, they are able to have a better quality of life. They can enjoy more activities and are better able to enjoy relaxing.

“People see me as a pain expert and doctor, but really what I am is someone who gives people their quality of life back,” adds Dr. Bajaj. “It’s a great day to know that someone will live a better quality of life and be able to enjoy their days because of a procedure I did. That makes my own life even better.”

Dr. Bajaj has found success with a new minimally invasive technique that relieves pressure on the spine and nerves and is largely replacing the more invasive options. Unlike the older back surgery options, the new procedure doesn’t take as long to perform, doesn’t require hospitalization, and offers a quick recovery and healing time.
Dr. Akash Bajaj is an award-winning surgeon and highly regarded pain management specialist who has earned the highly coveted Super Doctors honor. In addition to helping people with back pain, he provides pain solutions for those with neck pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, ankle and foot pain, and more. For more information on services provided or to book an appointment, visit their site at: remedypainsolutions.com.

About Remedy Spine & Pain Solutions
Founded and run by award-winning surgeon and pain management expert Dr. Akash Bajaj, the center is located in Marina Del Rey, Calif. They provide advanced solutions for those who suffer from all types of chronic pain. They also offer a minimally invasive, highly effective implant surgery for those with chronic back pain. Remedy Spine & Pain Solutions has won numerous awards, including multiple times winning Super Doctors award and the Best of Marina Del Rey award. For more information on services provided, visit their site at: remedypainsolutions.com.

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Sources:

Journal of Pain Research. A review of chronic pain impact on patients… 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4935027/

National Institutes of Health. Low back pain fact sheet. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Low-Back-Pain-Fact-Sheet