10 Post Interview Follow-Up Questions

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“Why doesn’t the company call me back?” or “I feel like I have no power; all I can do is wait for an answer,” or “Can’t I do anything to make the employer say yes?” These are common complaints from individuals who express frustration following a job interview.

Ford R. Myers, career coach, speaker and author of Get The Job You Want, Even When No One’s Hiring, says, “There is no ‘secret trick’ or ‘magic bullet’ that will get the employer to offer you the job. However, there are some strategies you can use to influence the employer’s decision and finesse the process. Changing many of your small actions can actually make a big difference in the outcome of your interviews.”

Here are 10 suggestions for navigating through the interview process and following up afterward:

  1. Set the stage for effective follow-up. This step will help you feel prepared, proactive, and more in control. Developing your follow-up strategy before the interview will even enhance your behavior during the interview.
  2. Act more like a consultant than an applicant. Focus on asking intelligent, probing questions about the employer’s business needs, problems, and challenges (like a good consultant would). Write down the interviewer’s answers, which will become the foundation for your follow-up steps.
  3. Don’t rush toward an offer. The purpose of your initial interview is not to get an offer, but to get invited back for a second meeting—most likely with a higher-level individual at the company. Use every interview to ask more questions and uncover the employer’s primary needs and problems.
  4. Confirm next steps. Don’t settle for “Thanks for coming; we’ll let you know” or similar comments that place you in a passive position. Assume a more active role, and get a commitment from the employer for their next steps and time frames.
  5. Follow up promptly and compellingly. Now that your interview is over, send your thank you letters as soon as possible. These should be personalized to each individual (not generic) and must include specific references to each person with whom you met (something they said or contributed during the interview).
  6. Use every follow-up contact as a chance to build your value. In your thank you letter, include brief synopses of your accomplishments, tying them directly to the company’s stated needs and challenges (usually in a side-by-side chart format). You can even support your “claims” by sending the employer samples of your work, if appropriate.
  7. Be punctual and persistent. Be meticulous in your business etiquette, which includes consistent, regular follow-ups by phone and e-mail. Be persistent in expressing your sincere interest in the opportunity, but don’t be a pest.
  8. Leverage outside resources. If you have contacts and connections with anyone who might influence the hiring decision, or who actually knows the interviewer, ask them to “put in a good word for you” after the initial interview.
  9. Accept rejection gracefully. If you get the message (directly or indirectly) that the company is not interested in you, or if they actually reject you, then all you can do is move on.
  10. Turn defeat into victory. After being rejected, the first thing you should do is send a letter thanking them for considering you. You can add that “you would be happy to be contacted again, if the selected candidate does not work out.” You can really distinguish yourself from the other rejected applicants if you send this sort of polite, professional letter.

By employing these follow-up strategies after the interview, you will improve your chances of getting more offers, and you will also feel more empowered and effective throughout the hiring process!

Reprinted by permission of Ford R. Myers, a nationally known Career Coach and author of Get The Job You Want, Even When No One’s Hiring.

 

Comcast Partners With The American Association Of People With Disabilities To Help Close The Digital Divide

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woman suing computer with internet access smiling

At the Newseum recently, Comcast announced a series of initiatives designed to help address the digital divide for low-income Americans with disabilities through the Internet Essentials program, the nation’s largest and most comprehensive Internet adoption program for low-income households. 

The largest of these was a grant from the Company to the American Association for People with Disabilities (AAPD).  The Comcast grant will help fund the creation and delivery of digital literacy training programs specifically designed to address the needs of low-income people in the disability community.  Once developed, the programs will be delivered at 10 AAPD affiliates across the country, as well as shared online for anyone to access.

According to Pew Research Center, 23 percent of people with disabilities say they never go online and 57 percent say they do not have a home broadband subscription.

The grant follows last month’s announcement that, since 2011, the Internet Essentials program has connected more than eight million low-income Americans to the Internet at home, including nearly 210,000 in the greater Washington, D.C. metro area, 90 percent of whom were not connected to the Internet at home until they signed up through Internet Essentials.  In addition, the company made the most significant eligibility change in the program’s history, expanding eligibility to all low-income households residing in the Comcast service area, including all low-income seniors, adults, and people with disabilities.

“The Internet is an incredible resource so long as you have the skills and the tools to use it,” said David L. Cohen, Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer at Comcast Corporation.  “By partnering with AAPD and working with the disability community, we want to address and break down the barriers to broadband adoption that are unique to this population.  The first step is to address digital literacy issues and facilitate digital skills development.  So, we’re going to create relevant training programs and then fund their delivery at locations across the country.”

“Having an Internet connection at home is absolutely vital for low-income people living with disabilities,” said Maria Town, President and CEO of the American Association for People with Disabilities.  “I commend Comcast for extending its Internet Essentials program to people with disabilities because it will help us advance our mission to provide equal access, integration, and full inclusion for Americans with disabilities.”

In addition, Comcast held events across the Washington, DC area to raise awareness of the digital divide with special guests Paralympic Gold Medalist and Purple Heart Recipient Rico Roman, and Olympic Gold Medalists from the U.S. Women’s Hockey Team Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson and Monique Lamoureux-Morando.

As part of the day’s events, the Company held a digital literacy assembly at Walker Jones Elementary, where Cohen surprised 50 sixth graders with free laptops and six months of complimentary Internet Essentials service.  The company also hosted a digital inclusion event at the Hattie Holmes Senior Wellness Center where 100 seniors were given free laptops to help them stay connected to family and friends in the 21st century way of life.  Lastly, Comcast held a Youth Hockey Clinic with Roman, Lamoureux-Davidson, and Lamoureux-Morando, where the Company surprised 25 students from Cornerstone Schools in Ward 7 with free laptops to help further their education.  In partnership with Dell Technologies, the companies provided new equipment to Friends of Fort Dupont Ice Arena for its computer lab.

Internet Essentials has an integrated, wrap-around design that addresses each of the three major barriers to broadband adoption that research has identified.  These include: a lack of digital literacy skills, lack of awareness of the relevance of the Internet to everyday life needs, and fear of the Internet; the lack of a computer; and cost of internet service.  The program is structured as a partnership between Comcast and tens of thousands of school districts, libraries, elected officials, and nonprofit community partners.

Source: Comcast

Kellogg’s Rice Krispies made sensory love notes to support kids with autism

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childs hand holding a special Rice Krispies treat

As the school year gets underway, Rice Krispies is thinking about what notes parents may want to tuck into their kids’ lunch boxes. (Exhausted parents, on the other hand, may be counting down the days until they can foist lunch-making duties back on to the school cafeteria, no judgment.)

Last year, the Kellogg cereal brand teamed up with the National Federation of the Blind to create specialized “Love Notes” with phrases like “You’ve Got This” to “Love You Lots” written in braille for parents to share with children who are blind.

It was a sweet, inclusive message. Now Rice Krispies is continuing its mission with a new kind of love note, this one designed with children living with autism or on the autism spectrum in mind.

Since not every child communicates love through words, the cereal company partnered with Autism Speaks to create touch-and-feel sensory “Love Notes” so children can actually feel love and support as they transition back to school.

The four “lightly reusable” stickers come in a range of supposedly calming colors and different textures, including fleece, faux fur, satin, and velour for sensory-focused kids to feel the love through a tactile experience.

Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

One Warrior’s Illuminating Journey

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Michael Landry standing outside at a sporting event

The future looks bright for this veteran entrepreneur, who miraculously regained his once lost eyesight.

By Annie Nelson

Marine Corps 1st Sgt. Michael J. Landry Jr. was returning from his 5th combat deployment as a Field Radio Operator when he received orders to Okinawa, Japan in August 2014. He underwent an eye exam and was told his vision had changed but not to worry.

However in Japan, Landry noticed his vision was getting worse—so much so that his optometrist thought he was exaggerating his condition. It was then he was told that both of his corneas were shattered and he was legally blind in both eyes.

I spoke with Landry about his amazing journey, from regaining his sight to competing in the Marine Corps Trials to starting his own lifestyle clothing and music businesses.

Tell me about your journey to being able to see again?

I was medically evacuated from Okinawa in March 2016 and sent to Balboa Naval Hospital in San Diego, Calif. In Japan, I was still able to make out the outlines of objects because of the cloudy weather, but in California, I wasn’t able to see anything because it was so much brighter. I was fitted for hard-lens contacts until I received a corneal transplant in my left eye. The crazy thing was the eye transplant I received was originally blue! But then genetics took over and the eye eventually turned brown.

Due to my amazing doctor, the day after the surgery for the first time in two years, I was able to see the eye chart. Over the next 20 months, the vision in my left eye improved to the point that I was able to get prescription glasses, but only for the left lens because I was still blind in my right eye. Last February, I received the transplant for the right eye and today, I still have 12 stitches inside that eye but my vision overall is constantly improving.

You recently competed in the Marine Corps Trials—what events did you compete in and how did you finish? Are you going to the Warrior Games?

Yes, I competed in several events including track, shot put, discus, 100m sprint and powerlifting. For the powerlifting event, my doctor recommended to limit the weight because the excessive eye pressure could still cause damage. I was scheduled to run the 200m and 400m, but I pulled my hamstring during the 100m sprint. I ended up finishing first place in all events except powerlifting. I competed in the visually impaired category for field events, however, I did out throw every other competitor overall. I was also selected to compete in the Warrior Games and I’m looking forward to it.

What did the Marine Corps Trials teach you?

It taught me that I’m able to do more than I think. I’ve never competed in any of those sports before and it felt as if it came naturally. It also taught me that I need to learn to stretch better so I don’t get hurt!

You are a new entrepreneur. Tell me about your businesses and how you started?

The birth of One Life Clothing started when I was going blind. I tried to convince myself that it wasn’t true so I began sewing with the thought that in order to sew, you have to be able to see. Going blind at the age of 32 forces you to see life in a different perspective. Tomorrow isn’t promised and you never know what can happen so you should always enjoy the “One Life” you have.

My second business I actually credit with saving my life. I was going through a lot mentally and physically with the loss of my sight and was severely depressed. At one point I was contemplating suicide until one day my brother, who is a rap artist, called me to vent about his music career, or lack thereof due to bad business deals. To help him, I started One Life Entertainment Music Group, LLC. Thus far, we’ve released four solo albums and two compilation albums.

My non-profit organization, One Life At A Time Outreach, helps not only feed the homeless, but also provide necessities like clothes, toiletries and shoes.

Michael Landry portrait with children Makiya and Michael III
Michael with children Makiya and Michael III

What does the future look like for you?

Bright I would say. Losing your vision and gaining it back is a blessing on its own, no matter what life throws at me. I’ve already won because I can see again. I’m embracing the new me. Business-wise, I would love to get into government contract designing and making uniforms as well as getting my clothing line into stores.

What advice would you give other service members who are recovering from an injury or illness?

You have to embrace the new you. I know what it feels like to be completely alone and to be stuck in your own head, but you have to remember that you are here for a purpose. God will never give you a task that you can’t handle. We are all gifted—find your gift and get out of your comfort zone.

Continue to follow Landry’s journey at onelifeclothing.net and on onelifemuzik.com

Double amputee, 9, to walk New York Fashion Week runway: ‘Disability doesn’t stop you’

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Daisy May walking with prosthetic legs into makeup room before an event

A young girl in the U.K. isn’t letting her disability stop her from achieving her dreams. Daisy-May Demetre, 9, will reportedly become the first child double amputee to strut her stuff on the runway at New York Fashion Week in September, SWNS reported.

Daisy-May, of Birmingham, was born with fibular hemimelia, a birth defect where part or all of the fibula bone is missing. The condition is rare, occurring in 1 in 50,000 births, according to the Generic and Rare Disease Information Center. 

When she was 18 months old, Daisy-May’s parents Alex and Claire Demetre chose to have both of the young girl’s legs amputated — the right above the knee and the left below the knee — in the hopes of giving her a better quality of life with prosthetics.

“We had the choice for her to live like that or to go for the operation,” Alex, Daisy-May’s father, said. “We didn’t know at the time that Daisy-May would be as good as she is now.”

Indeed: Daisy-May is living proof determination can defy all odds. She is a gymnast as well as a model for Boden, the country’s largest clothing catalog, according to SWNS. She’s also modeled for Nike and the British retailer Matalan, among others.

But come Sept. 8, Daisy-May will take her modeling career to new heights when she walks the runway at New York Fashion Week. Daisy-May will walk for the French-inspired children’s fashion line Lulu et Gigi Couture. She was approached about the opportunity after the line’s founder and head designer, Eni Hegedus-Buiron, spotted her modeling in London.

“I was asked if I was OK with having an amputee walk in my show. To be honest I was surprised by the question. For me, a child is a child and thus is beautiful and perfect,” Hegedus-Buiron told the outlet. “So of course I said yes.”

Alex told SWNS he is proud that his daughter will make history, but noted he and his wife hope to see more child amputees featured on the runway.

“Disability doesn’t stop you —  it definitely doesn’t stop Daisy,” Alex said, adding his daughter “belongs on the catwalk.”

Continue on to Fox News to read the complete article.

Target Unveils Adaptive Halloween Costumes For Kids With Disabilities

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child dressed in pirate costume sitting in decoratedwheelchair

Target’s newest Halloween offerings include adaptive costumes for kids with disabilities ― a sign that major retailers may finally be stepping up to make the commercial costume industry more inclusive.

The big-box giant is selling four disability-friendly costumes and two themed wheelchair covers through its Hyde and Eek! Boutique. Two of the options ― a princess dress and pirate ensemble ― are aimed at kids who use wheelchairs.

According to the online store descriptions, they were “thoughtfully designed with openings in the back that lend ease of dressing.” The costumes coordinate with decorative pirate ship and princess carriage wheelchair covers, which retail for $45 each. The princess dress and crown set costs $20 and the pirate get-up is $25.

The new line also includes sensory-friendly unicorn and shark costumes to accommodate kids with sensitivities. Per the website descriptions, both feature “an allover plush construction for a soft and cozy feel,” “flat seams with no tags,” “a hidden opening in the front pocket for convenient abdominal access” and the option to remove attachments like hoods. Each retails for $30.

Over the years, lots of children and adults with disabilities have gotten creative around Halloween time, with many putting together homemade costumes that incorporate wheelchairs and other assistive devices. There have also been adaptive costume options from small-scale vendors on sites like Etsy.

Target’s latest product line appears to be the first such costume offering from a major retailer.

Continue on to the Huffington Post to read the complete article.

‘Born This Way’ To End With Digital Wrap-Up Series & Finale Special On A&E

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Born this Way cast gathered on stage

A&E’s Emmy-winning docuseries Born This Way is coming to an end, with a fifth and final season.

The network said recently that the series will wrap with a six-part shortform digital series to begin premiering later this year on AEtv.com, and a one-hour linear series finale holiday special, to air in December on A&E.

Born This Way concluded its fourth season in May 2018. The digital series will pick up following last season’s wedding of cast members Cristina and Angel, and will continue the story of Elena, John, Megan, Rachel, Sean, Steven, Cristina and Angel.

In the hourlong series finale special, the cast will reflect on their personal growth across the four seasons of the show and discuss Born This Way’s impact on the way society views people with disabilities, according to A&E. “From finding jobs to navigating relationships and break ups to exerting their own independence, the cast will rejoice in the journey they have been on together and thank fans for all of their support along the way,” A&E said.

It’s not often that you get to make television like Born This Way which has had such a positive impact on the world. The show unquestionably changed how society views people with Down syndrome and how people with Down syndrome see themselves,” said Executive Producer Jonathan Murray. “It has shown that no one should have to live with artificial limits placed upon them and all of us, no matter what challenges we face, want the same things – independence, a chance for meaningful employment and a chance to contribute to our families and communities.”

“Being a part of the amazing and inspiring journey of our cast over the past four seasons has been an honor for myself and everyone at A&E,” said Elaine Frontain Bryant, EVP and Head of Programming, A&E Network. “We have all learned so much from their openness, resilience and spirit, and we will be forever grateful to them for welcoming us and viewers into their lives.”

Continue on to Deadline to read the complete article.

First US National Park to Offer Heavy-Duty Wheelchairs for Disabled Visitors to Enjoy the Scenery

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Woman Using Track Wheelchair at Sleeping Bear Dunes

This national park in Michigan has just become the first to implement heavy-duty wheelchairs as a means of allowing disabled visitors to enjoy their trails.

The “track chair” is a wheelchair that has been equipped with treads to navigate the steep hills and sandy trails of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

The track chair program, which was launched in May, was created by Friends of Sleeping Bear Dunes—an organization that specializes in making the park more accessible to visitors.

“Here at Sleeping Bear Dunes, about half the park is designated wilderness so in those areas we can’t do a lot of maintenance or changes [to increase accessibility,]” group board chairman Kerry Kelly told CNN. “So the better option is to have a vehicle that can take the person into these areas so they can experience the trail as it is without having to make major modifications.”

The track chair can currently only be rented out for use on the 1.5-mile long Bay View Trail; however, the organization says that the track chair has already been utilized by dozens of visitors.

The track chair is free for visitors to use so long as they reserve it several days in advance.

Continue on to the Good News Network to read the complete article.

Born This Way Actress Shatters Disability Stigma

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Cristina Sanz poses on red carpet

Fans of the hit A&E docu-series Born this Way know Cristina Sanz as a lovable, fun and family-oriented dancer and romantic. In 2016, Sanz became the first Hispanic woman with a disability as part of an ensemble cast to be on an Emmy award-winning show.

In 2018, she shattered stigmas by getting married to her longtime fiancé Angel Callahan.

The two already had been dating for five years before the show premiered. Their desire to live an independent life together—and get married—was a consistent plot line throughout the show. The first season ended with their engagement; the fourth season finale was an hour-long episode featuring the wedding between these two individuals with developmental disabilities.

“I wanted to show everyone that you can have a disability and get married,” Sanz told People magazine.

Her wedding, moving out on her own and working at two jobs are things her parents never imagined as Cristina was growing up.

“I will not wake up waiting for my daughter to come back from a date like my mother did for me,” her mother, Beatriz Sanz, said she used to think. But Sanz was the first of her siblings to get married.

While studies show many people within the Hispanic and other communities do not publicly discuss their own or a child’s disability due to negative stigmas, Sanz and her parents lead by example by allowing television viewers to watch her life unfold on TV. Therefore, she is an important example of RespectAbility’s #RespectTheAbility campaign, which features people with disabilities who succeed in their chosen career.

When disability is depicted in pop culture, it tends to be all white. Real storytelling requires exploring people of all backgrounds. In addition, far too many Hispanics and Latinos in America who have a developmental disability are not receiving the diagnosis, school accommodations and high expectations they need to succeed. Today, only 65 percent of students with disabilities graduate high school, and only 7 percent complete college.

“[Born This Way] tells our stories, our dreams,” Sanz said. “People can see that our lives are most of the time very typical. People with disabilities have jobs, fall in love, have businesses and enjoy time with friends.”

Our nation’s economy is strongest when it is inclusive of the value that diverse talent brings to the workplace. Harriet Tubman had epilepsy, performer Selena Gomez lives with lupus, business leader and Shark Tank superstar Barbara Corcoran is dyslexic and gymnast Simone Biles has ADHD. Each of them, like Sanz, is a positive role model for success.

Sanz works for her dad’s school as well as at a senior center. Our nation’s economy is strongest when it is inclusive of the value that diverse talent brings to the workplace. Celebrities like Sanz are making a difference.

“What Cristina really inspired us, is that we want to focus on the abilities of everybody—not what people can’t do, but what they can do,” Elaine Hall, founder of the Miracle Project, said.

Source: respectability.org

The Pretty One: With a New Memoir, Writer-Activist Keah Brown Is Redefining Disability on Her Own

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Keah Brown book cover The Pretty One shows Keah smiling with an outdoor background

How do you say the word “disability”? Does it feel shameful or derogatory, or does it roll off of your tongue, matter-of-factly? Writer and disability activist Keah Brown wishes we were all less precious when talking about disability, because while it may be a fact of her life, it’s far from the whole of it, as she reveals in her new, but already acclaimed book of autobiographical essays, The Pretty One, which has garnered praise from luminaries like Deepak Chopra and Roxane Gay, who wrote:

“What does it mean to live at the intersections of blackness, womanhood, and disability? In her admirable debut, The Pretty One, Keah Brown answers this question with heart, charm, and humor. Across twelve finely-crafted essays, Brown explores the matter of representation in popular culture, the vulnerability of facing self-loathing and learning to love herself, the challenge of repairing fractured relationships with family, the yearning for romantic love. Through her words we see that Brown is not just the pretty one; she is the magnificently human one.”

For those of us whose knowledge of cerebral palsy extends about as far as remembering “Cousin Geri” on Facts of Life, it’s worth noting that the title of Keah Brown’s debut book is a story, in and of itself. Aside from being born with cerebral palsy, she was also born a twin, just ahead of able-bodied sister Leah—who was often dubbed (you guessed it) “the pretty one” by classmates and potential suitors.

Keah’s reclaiming of the phrase came after reckoning with years of physical and emotional pain, insecurities, jealousy, reconciliation and ultimately, accepting her ridiculously talented, #DisabledAndCute existence, the hashtag that garnered the writer her first book deal (and earned her a spot on 2018’s The Root 100). Speaking with The Glow Up, Brown explains how she found her pretty—and why she neither desires nor will accept anyone’s pity.

The Glow Up: You have cerebral palsy, which you describe as a disability both visible and invisible. You also talk about having a part of your body “working for and against you at the same time.” For those of us unfamiliar, can you explain how that manifests for you?

Keah Brown: Well, CP [cerebral palsy] is different for everyone who has it. For me, I have a mild form of hemiplegia that impacts the right side of my body. This means my reaction times are slower, I have delayed motor function and the right side of my brain sends its signals to the right side of my body at a slower time as well. I also walk with a limp and tire quicker than your average non-disabled person. My body is working twice as hard to function. So, it’s working for me to live, which I love, but because of my disability, it’s also twice as much work so on the bad days it feels like it’s working against me.

Continue on to The Root to read the complete article.

High-Tech Jobs for the Neurodiverse

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image of wheels cranking with man holding cell phone in his hand

Expandability, a not-for-profit division of Goodwill of Silicon Valley, uses a neurodiverse set of professionals to operate its innovative employment program, Neurodiversity Pathways, formerly called Autism Advantage. The organization increases accessibility to high-tech jobs for neurodivergent individuals, many of whom are on the autism spectrum.

Neurodiversity advocates promoting support systems (such as inclusion-focused services, accommodations, communication and assistive technologies, occupational training, and independent living support) that allow those who are neurodivergent to live their lives as they are, rather than being coerced or forced to adopt uncritically accepted ideas of normality, or to conform to a clinical ideal.

Designed for underemployed or unemployed neurodiverse adults who hold or are working toward a two- or four-year degree (or equiva-lent), the program equips them with workplace and personal effectiveness skills needed to succeed in today’s work environment. Neurodiversity Pathways also supports and educates employers across industries including financial services, networking, security, and enterprise software, on the value of hiring neurodiverse candidates.

Expandability used a $50,000 grant from Symantec Corporation to enhance its program and extend its reach. Cecily Joseph, Vice President of Corporate Responsibility at Symantec, said, “The Expandability program provides crucial access to high-tech jobs for a group of tremendously skilled people within our community, who are often underrepresented by traditional hiring practices.”

Building on previous success, the Neurodiversity Pathways program makes a direct connection between employers and neurodivergent individuals, while also raising awareness in the community to their unique skillsets. To ensure success, the program trains hiring managers and their teams on how to create an inclusive environment. Continuing to build best practices and engagement will bring more employers and candidates to the program and increase employment opportunities.

“Expandability has a unique opportunity to address a need often overlooked,” said Trish Dorsey, Executive Director of Expandability. “Employers are looking for strong technical talent to fill critical roles. Talented people on the autism spectrum can help fill this gap. With Symantec’s generous grant, we can provide training and make corporate connections that are not afforded with traditional education and recruiting processes.”

For more information, visit ndpathways.org.